Famous Writers on Travel: Part III

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American poet and writer Maya Angelou once said:

“Perhaps travel cannot prevent bigotry, but by demonstrating that all peoples cry, laugh, eat, worry, and die, it can introduce the idea that if we try and understand each other, we may even become friends.”  Wouldn’t Take Nothing for My Journey Now (1993) p. 12.

By focusing on commonalities, rather than differences, people inherently become more tolerant. Though there are beliefs, opinions, values and traditions that separate us – and we are entitled to these – travel opens up a new world.

How can one appreciate differences? What attributes or experiences do all humans share?

6 thoughts on “Famous Writers on Travel: Part III

    1. I do wish more people looked at it that way. It’s tricky sometimes for some to be more open minded or understanding, especially if they have been exposed to very few things and simply don’t know about other cultures or beliefs.

  1. Wow, what an interesting perspective on it! I especially love that you said, “Seeing that perfect image in each person, no matter how imperfect, extends commonality to all people.” Judging others only isolates people, and I think accepting or “agreeing to disagree” on differences is the way to go.

  2. I think Mother Teresa offered a way – she saw the image of God in every person she met. And she was so in love with God that she couldn’t help but love everyone she met. Seeing that perfect image in each person, no matter how imperfect, extends commonality to all people.

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